PoliBlog: A Rough Draft of my Thoughts

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  1. Celebrate Freedom - Read a Banned Book

    My husband used to have a shirt that said that. It was then followed by a list of banned books, most of which he had read. Today’s FFM challenge from Poliblog is this: Which of the The 100 Most Frequently Challenged Books of 1990–2000 have you read?

    Trackback by Irrational Woman — Friday, October 14, 2005 @ 9:14 am

  2. Good God! I must be running with a bad crowd. Here’s my list: [This reminds me of something I think The New Yorker did a couple of years back-asking famous writers the classic book(s) that they feel most embarassed about never having read. I’d like to hear your list, Steven!]

    I Know Why the Caged Bird Sings by Maya Angelou
    The Adventures of Huckleberry Finn by Mark Twain
    Of Mice and Men by John Steinbeck
    The Catcher in the Rye by J.D. Salinger
    Heather Has Two Mommies by Leslea Newman
    # The Color Purple by Alice Walker
    Sex by Madonna
    The Handmaid’s Tale by Margaret Atwood
    To Kill a Mockingbird by Harper Lee
    Beloved by Toni Morrison
    Brave New World by Aldous Huxley
    The House of Spirits by Isabel Allende
    Native Son by Richard Wright
    The Adventures of Tom Sawyer by Mark Twain
    Song of Solomon by Toni Morrison
    Private Parts by Howard Stern

    Comment by Frank Sintatra — Friday, October 14, 2005 @ 10:15 am

  3. The ALA’s 100 most frequently challenged book list

    Poliblog asks which of the 100 most frequently challenged books have you read?

    I’ve read:

    Trackback by The Yin Blog — Friday, October 14, 2005 @ 12:03 pm

  4. 100 Most Challenged Books Meme

    Meme from PoliBlog (via The Yin Blog): Which of the The 100 Most Frequently Challenged Books of 1990–2000 have you read?

    Trackback by Lifechanges ... Delayed — Friday, October 14, 2005 @ 3:43 pm

  5. Banned Books Meme

    Another meme of the week from Poliblog:
    How many of the Top 100 Challenged Books does our family own or have I read:
    The Adventures of Huckleberry Finn by Mark Twain
    Of Mice and Men by John Steinbeck
    Harry Potter (Series) by J.K. Rowling
    Bridge to T…

    Trackback by Ut Humiliter Opinor — Saturday, October 15, 2005 @ 7:27 am

  6. In Favor of Banning Books

    Most book-banners want to censor material because it is morally or politically objectionable; I, on the other hand, wish to ban certain materials because they are aesthetically displeasing, yet have somehow become so over-rated that they cannot seem …

    Trackback by Unlocked Wordhoard — Saturday, October 15, 2005 @ 8:12 am

  7. I would also like to add an honorable mention: The Wind Done Gone, by Alice Randall, the Gone with the Wind parody that sent the Daughters of Confederacy into a tizzy. I understand that it was banned in Georgia.

    My list:
    Scary Stories (Series) by Alvin Schwartz

    I Know Why the Caged Bird Sings by Maya Angelou

    The Adventures of Huckleberry Finn by Mark Twain

    Of Mice and Men by John Steinbeck

    Harry Potter (Series) by J.K. Rowling

    The Color Purple by Alice Walker

    To Kill a Mockingbird by Harper Lee

    Flowers for Algernon by Daniel Keyes

    A Light in the Attic by Shel Silverstein

    Brave New World by Aldous Huxley

    James and the Giant Peach by Roald Dahl

    Are You There, God? It’s Me, Margaret by Judy Blume

    Lord of the Flies by William Golding

    Carrie by Stephen King

    The Adventures of Tom Sawyer by Mark Twain

    How to Eat Fried Worms by Thomas Rockwell

    Comment by Sheri — Saturday, October 15, 2005 @ 11:47 am

  8. Actually, the list of banned/challenged books is the list of books I’d like to read before I die. I am fascinated by what IDEAS were so threatening that the words were forbidden to citizens (adults AND children), and why we are considered unable to make decisions concerning the material for ourselves.

    BTW, Waldo was banned for NUDITY.

    Here’s a list of why some other books have been banned:

    http://www.forbiddenlibrary.com/

    Comment by Laura — Sunday, October 30, 2005 @ 12:33 pm

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